THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT ASHEVILLE

 

FACULTY SENATE

 

Senate Document Number    1512S

 

Date of Senate Approval      01/19/12

 

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Statement of Faculty Senate Action:

 

 

APC Document 8:      Add new course, HIST 309, History of the Old South;

                                    Add new course, HIST 391, The History of the Atlantic World, 1492-1820

 

Effective Date:  Fall, 2012

 

 

1.         Add:               On page 168, new course, HIST 309, History of the “Old South”:

 

309      History of the “Old South” (3)

Examines the social, political, and cultural development of the very distinctive region that became known as “The South,” from the colonial through antebellum periods in British colonial America/the United States.  Explores the ways in which the cultures of the region – American Indian, African/African American, and white -- constructed their societies, and how identities changed as a result of contact with other races, ethnicities, and persons of different socio-economic levels. See Department Chair.

 

 

Impact Statement:

Because this course has been taught before, there will be no impact to staffing loads. Students will benefit from the permanent addition of this Diversity Intensive course.

 

Rationale: 

This course has been taught previously as a History 373 “Special Topics” course.  It is a popular course, and it carries the Diversity Intensive designation.  Because this course has enjoyed high enrollment as a Special Topics course and contributes to ILS, the department would like to make it a permanent offering.

 

 

 

 

2.         Add:               On page 170, new course, HIST 391, The History of the Atlantic World, 1492-1820:

 

            391      The History of the Atlantic World, 1492-1820 (3)

Examines the Atlantic world through the experiences of the men and women who inhabited it through the revolutions of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Instead of a chronological approach, explores specific topics that illustrate how the new Atlantic World was created by the interaction among the peoples from Africa, Europe, and the Americas. See Department Chair.

 

 

Impact Statement:

Because this course has been taught before, there will be no impact to staffing loads. Students will benefit from the permanent addition of this Diversity Intensive course, and the Atlantic World course will be cross-listed with Africana Studies, thus increasing that program’s course offerings. It also contributes to the new Ghana ILS Cluster.

 

Rationale: 

This course has been taught previously as a History 373 “Special Topics” course.  It is a popular course, carries the Diversity Intensive designation, contributes to an ILS Cluster, and can be cross-listed with Africana Studies.  Because this course has enjoyed high enrollment as a Special Topics course and contributes to ILS, the department would like to make it a permanent offering.